Scholefield Family Tree

Here is another instance which proves that when you are using online searches you should spice up the variety.

When I search on Google for “Arnold Scholefield,” I get the results that I have previously presented (the books about Abigail’s family and sources that relate to his ministry in the Methodist-Episcopal Church).

When I search for “Rev. Arnold Scholefield,” I return two results about Harriet Hall which report that she was his daughter. Now, just to be sure that she is not the child of a man who shared the name, one of the sources is a query from USGenNet.org’s forums that states that the father, a methodist minister, had been buried in Siloam Cemetery.1

blockquoteDr. Harriet E. Hall died at Whitesboro on Jan. 19, 1867, aged 38 yrs. Her funeral was held at the Free Church in Peterboro, NY, with Gerrit Smith as the principal speaker. She is buried at Peterboro with 2 of her children. Her husband was Julius C. Hall; he is not buried with her. She was the daugher of Rev Arnold Scholefield, who is buried at Siloam, near Peterboro. He was a Methodist minister. Does anyone know why Harriet had the title “Dr.”?2

As I write this post, USGenNet’s forums have fallen victim to a hacker and they cannot be accessed directly. However, I can use Google’s caches to my benefit — and did — to get as much of the text as possible. I did this by using “phrases” near the beginning or end of the search results preview. However, I have no way to contact the author for possible collaboration on the research which has already been completed.

And I can answer the question — whenever the forums come back online. Harriet was indeed a Doctor. A Google search for “harriet e hall” turns up a page titled “History of Homœopathy and Its Institutions in America.” Mrs. Harriet E. Hall of Peterboro was a member of the first class of students who attended the New York Medical College for Women, the first woman’s homœopathic medical college in the world, and she graduated in 1865.3

The second result returned by the altered search leads to a transcription of Peterboro Village Cemetery, confirming that “Hall, Harriet F., wf Julius C. & dau Rev. Arnold Scholefield, d. 19 Jan 1867 ac 38yr.”4 This introduces a different middle initial, but Es and Fs can be easily confused. And when a check is run on Find A Grave, it is noted that this second transcriber reports her name as having the E and gives her vitals as 1828-1867.5

Based on the information from these sources, Harriet “Hattie” E. Scholefield married Julius C. Hall and they had at least the following children: Julius Hall (7 July 1851-22 Feb 1868) and Stannie Hall (Aug 1859-7 Mar 1862).

It appears that Harriet was actually the youngest daughter of Arnold and Abigail Scholefield. It does not suprise me that I placed Charlotte in the wrong spot on the chart because of her widely fluctuating reported age.

1. See post dated 21 Apr 2009.
2. “Dr. Harriet E. Hall,” Oneida County, New York, Queries Board, message forum (www.usgennet.org/usa/ny/county/oneida/webbbs/queries/index.cgi : accessed 16 Jun 2009).
3. William Harvey King M.D., LL.D., History of Homœopathy and Its Institutions in America; online edition, HOMÉOPATHE INTERNATIONAL (http://www.homeoint.org/history/king/index.htm : downloaded 16 Jun 2009), Chapter IV: New York Medical College and Hospital for Women.
4. “Peterboro Village Cemetery,” transcription (http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nc99usgw/cempeter.txt : accessed 16 Jun 2009), entry for Hall, Harriet F.
5. Jim Tipton, Find A Grave, database (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 17 Jun 2009), entry for Harriet E. Scholefield Hall (1828-1867), Peterboro Cemetery, Peterboro, Madison, New York.

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Govanstown Cemetery Project

The Whittle Plot

I have left Elizabeth Whittle, grandmother of Samuel N., alone until now. Women born prior to 1850 are usually the most difficult to research. We are going to work back from the known and see if we can discover anything about Elizabeth Whittle that will help us resolve her identity.

Our first mention of Elizabeth was in my 6 Oct 2008 post when she appears living with Samuel and family on the 1870 census. We found her again with Eliza on the 1860 census and followed her back to the 1850 census. I found her obituary from 21 Jun 1877:1

blockquoteWHITTLE – At her residence, Towsontown, Md. June 19th, 1877, MRS. ELIZABETH WHITTLE, aged 91 years, 8 months and 9 days. She was a native of Lancaster county Pennsylvania, but for the last 73 years a resident of Towsontown.

Her funeral will take place from her late residence, today, Thursday 21st at 2 o’clock P.M. – Remains interred at Govanstown Presbyterian Church Cemetery. Her friends are respectfully invited to attend.

The best part of this obituary is the information concerning her age – 91 years, 8 month and 9 days. I bounced over to the Tombstone Birthday Calculator and entered the information and out popped a birth date of 12 Oct 1785. We’ll go with this date in the absence of any other information at this time. However, you should remember that the age at death was provided by someone that wasn’t there when she was born. The age would have come from a family member and could be in error. How many times when upset by a situation have you confused your own date of birth, much less that of another family member?

The other important piece of information is the Lancaster County birth location. How did she wind up in Baltimore? Did her family move to Baltimore with her? A good piece of information always leads to more questions!

When Ruth contacted me she supplied the information that Elizabeth’s husband was Jeremiah Whittle and they were married in 1818 in Baltimore by Minister Nathan Greenfield. Her name is listed in that record as Eyle, however, on her son’s death certificate her name is listed as Hall. I went to Ancestry and found her marriage to Jeremiah from 5 Dec 1818. If we use the birth date determined by her death date then she would have been 33 years old at the time of her marriage – not exactly a young bride. Is it possible that she was married before? Perhaps her maiden name is Hall and her widowed name is Eyle? It’s also possible that the information on the death certificate of Hall was supplied by someone that couldn’t remember her name and thought it might be Hall. Every piece of information raises more questions!

A search of the census records from 1790, 1800, and 1810 shows no one with the name of Eyles, Iles, or Ayles in Pennsylvania or Maryland. There are multiple candidates for the name of Hall with females of the right age in the household for 1790 and 1800, but no way to narrow it down. It’s terribly unfair that you just can’t click on a great name like Eyle and have it all laid out for you. I would like, just once, to have a theory and be able to with one click find a convenient marriage record, death record, or a nice obituary. At this point I have a theory and nothing to go with it.

1. “Mortuary Notices,” The Sun, 21 Jun 1877, p. 2; digital images, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 27 Sep 2008), Historic Newspapers.

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Govanstown Cemetery Project

The Whittle Plot

Well gang we had some real success this week!! I received a response from the family that had posted the thread on Ancestry in the Community Section. Ya gotta love those message boards!!! Family member Ruth posted a message that explained her relationship to Samuel N. Whittle. Her husband’s 1st cousin twice removed – she was kind enough to follow that with the more basic explanation of it being her husband’s grandfather’s first cousin. Since that post we have been in touch several times via email and she has been kind enough to share some of her family research and has given me permission to use the information on this site. This post will be a compilation of the information that Ruth has given me concerning the immediate family.

Elizabeth Whittle (Samuel’s grandmother) was married to Jeremiah Whittle born about 1775.

It appears that Jeremiah was married twice: first to a Nancy Best, 16 June 1804 Zion German Lutheran Church, Baltimore and then to Elizabeth Eyle in 1818 –minister Nathan Greenfield. (On her son Jeremiah’s death certificate he listed her surname as Hall.) [The family has no burial date or site for Jeremiah.]

The children of Jeremiah and Elizabeth Whittle were:
Thomas born about 1820 [this is the great grandfather of Ruth’s husband]
Jeremiah A. born about 1824
John born about 1829
Unknown1 (which is Samuel N. Whittle’s father) – the family does not know his name yet either.
[I believe from our research that they can add Susan A. Whittle Barber to this list]1

Children of Unknown1 Whittle and Eliza (maiden name unknown) Whittle are:
Charles Nicholas Whittle born 7 July 1838, died 22 Oct. 1916 who married Margaret Sevilla Boone 8 Nov. 1864, she died 1923. They are both buried in Greenmount Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland. He was a 1st Lieut. in the Union army in the Civil War. He was 5′ 10, florid complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes.

Samuel N. (probably Nelson) Whittle born about 1843, died 7 Oct. 1892. He died after falling from a boarding house in Alleghany City, Pa., it was a construction accident. He was a plasterer and possibly a blacksmith. He was a 2nd Lieut. in the Union Army in the Civil War. During a civil disturbance in Govanstown during a constitutional election in 1864 he was stabbed in the shoulder. He was 6′ tall, fair complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes.

He was married to Georgeanna who died between 1874 and 1876. [Although the family has no actual dates or records, they believe her to be buried in the Samuel N. Whittle lot at Govans Presbyterian Cemetery.]

The children of Samuel N. and Georgeanna Whittle were:

Clara May Whittle, born June 1866 in Towson, died 10 Dec 1946 and buried in Govans Presbyterian Cemetery.
Margaret (Maggie) Sevilla Whittle, born 1869 in Towson, died 3 Oct 1897 and buried in Govans also.

Eliza (maiden name unknown) Whittle named Clara May and Margaret Sevilla Whittle in her will.

1. See post date 9 Oct 2008.

**Note – items in parenthesis() are from the family. Items in brackets[] are my notes.

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