Hoyt Family Tree

I ran across Hayward and Lottie when I was working on a project to create a map of the enumeration districts on the 1930 Tucson Census.

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View 1930 Tucson Enumeration Districts in a larger map.
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Unfortunately, for several districts, the descriptions were not helpful: “excluding the city.” Checking the pages provided street names and other identifying notes for some. The Hoyts were on the first page of ED 59–a district that had no data that allowed it to be mapped. I decided to “adopt” someone on the page. This couple was intriguing because based on their ages and the date they married; they likely had no children who would be interested in tracing their lineage. A quick check of records showed that there would be enough to build a family tree for this couple.

So, our starting point for this project is:

blockquoteHayward N. Hoyt was the head of household.* He owned a home which was worth $30,000. There was no radio set in the home, and it was not a farm. Hayward was a white male who was 51 years old. He was married and his first marriage had occurred at age 43. He had attended school within the year and could read and write. He was born in Michigan; his parents had both been born in New York. Hayward was employed at a manager at a building land co. He was an employer. He was not a veteran.
Lottie D. Hoyt was Hayward’s wife. She was a 55-year-old white female. She had first married at age 46. She hadn’t attended school during the year and could read and write. She had been born in Michigan; her father had been born in New Jersey; her mother had been born in Michigan.
In the home are also a Jeanette M. Scudder, a 68-year-old widowed boarder from Michigan, and Estella M. Crowe, a 25-year-old single servant from Indiana.

1930 Census for the Hoyts

Research Plan:

  1. Check death records in Arizona. Did the Hoyts die here?
  2. Check earlier censuses.

* 1930 U.S. census, Pima County, Arizona population schedule, Tucson, enumeration district (ED) 59, sheet 1A, p. 99 (stamped), dwelling 5, family 5, Hayward N. Hoyt household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 Apr 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T626, roll 62.

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