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Govanstown Cemetery Project

The Whittle Plot

Searching for Samuel Whittle has been a challenge in spelling and creativity. I found him on Ancestry in 1870 by using a Wildcard Search for Sam* Whit*. This picks up all the variations for the end of the names. Still, the only record I found was the 1870 census with Samuel mis-indexed as Samuel N. White. He is clearly enumerated as Samuel N. Whittle and the household consists of:1

Whittle, Samuel N. 27 M W Plasterer
–, Georgeanna 24 F W Keeping House
–, Clara 3 F W
–, Maggie 1 F W
–, Eliza 55 F W
–, Elizabeth 85 F W
Higle, Kate 26 F W
Phipps, Joseph 18 M W Apprentice to Plasterer

With no relationships listed we are left guessing as to some of the people in the household. However, we know that Eliza is Samuel’s mother based on the obits and the 1880 census. Elizabeth is most probably, Samuel’s grandmother, but not Eliza’s mother, as her last name is also Whittle. Kate Higle is possibly a sister to Georgeanna. If she was anything other than a relative, she would probably be listed with a job such as a servant, nurse, or boarder.

Ancestry can be quirky – that’s a really nice way of saying it can be a pain in the butt! When you do a basic search it brings up the census records first and it doesn’t matter what you put in for a year of death (in this case 1892) it still loads you up with 1930 census records. For some reason it will give you 4 pages records that occurred after the death of your person while ignoring a record for an “unpopular” census or collection of records. As a result you will sometimes need to search by a specific census, collection, or by a geographical area.

I knew that he had been in the military so while I was in the census records I selected the 1890 Veterans Schedule, which has him indexed as Samuel W. Whittle. His service was listed as: First Lieutenant, F Company, 7th Maryland, 14 Oct 1862 to 31 May 1865, Length of Service 2 years 9 months 17 days. The corresponding line below indicates his residence is Towson, Baltimore County, and that he was shot in the left shoulder, but does not tell us in what engagement.2

Samuel Whittle 1890 Veterans Schedule

Samuel Whittle 1890 Veterans Schedule

The other things I found were on the first page of results in the Military section of the search. My favorite selection of the multiple Civil War items listed was the American Civil War Soldiers entry for Samuel Whittle that had the basics of his service record:3

Enlisted as a Sergeant on 14 August 1862 at the age of 19.
Enlisted in Company D, 7th Infantry Regiment Maryland on 14 Aug 1862.
Promoted to Full Sergeant Major on 10 Sep 1862.
Promoted to Full 2nd Lieutenant (As of Co. F) on 9 Nov 1863.
Promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant on 12 Dec 1864.
Mustered Out Company D, 7th Infantry Regiment Maryland on 31 May 1865 at Washington, DC.

Receiving a Commission from the Enlisted ranks was not uncommon during the Civil War. I also found several entries for his brother Charles N. Whittle who fought with the 2nd Maryland Infantry, Company C. He entered as a Second Lieutenant and left as a First Lieutenant. According to the 1890 Veterans Schedule, Charles enlisted 14 Jun 1862, but has no departure date or length of service. His corresponding line below gives 1320 Bond as his address with no further information. There is a curious shortage of information on this form.4

The problem with this type of research is that my focus is Samuel and who might be in the Govanstown Cemetery plot, but my curiosity is also about Charles and his odd service record Maybe, I’ll just take a quick peek at Footnote. I should look there for Samuel and it would only take a minute to check for Charles too.

Future Research
  • Kate Higle (possibly Higgle) in 1860
  • Elizabeth Whittle in 1860
  • Samuel 1850 & 1860

1. 1870 U.S. census, Baltimore County, Maryland, population schedule, District 9, p. 447, dwelling 6, family 6, Samuel Whittle; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 29 Sep 2008); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll 570.
2. 1890 U.S. census, Baltimore, Maryland, “Special Schedule: Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, and Widows,” Towson, enumeration district (ED) 439, p. 1, Samuel N. Whittle; NARA microfilm publication M123, roll 8.
3. Historical Data Systems, Inc., “American Civil War Soldiers,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 Oct 2008), entry for Samuel Whittle, enlisted 14 Aug 1862, Maryland.
4. 1890 U.S. census, Baltimore, Maryland, “Special Schedule: Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, and Widows,” Baltimore, enumeration district (ED) 125, p. 1, Charles N. Whittle; NARA microfilm publication M123, roll 8.

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Govanstown Cemetery Project

The Whittle Plot

Now that I’m comfortably sure I have the right man, I’m off to Ancestry for the basic grunt work – this is actually my favorite part! Put in a name and see what magic happens. Sometimes you get absolutely nothing and sometimes you get the whole family line. It’s like Christmas – will Santa give you the underwear you need or the IPod you want?

Once on Ancestry, I decided to create a family tree for Samuel, so I put in my known information for Samuel N. Whittle, born about 1842. This is based on the age 50 listed in his 1892 obituary. Place of birth was loaded as Baltimore, Maryland since I don’t know if he was born in Towson, where his mother died, or if I will just find him in Baltimore County. Death date: 7 Oct 1892 in Allegheny City, Allegheny, Pennsylvania. I determined the County by doing a Google Search for Allegheny City and looking at the Wikipedia entry. I found that Allegheny City existed from 1788-1907 and is now part of the North Side of Pittsburgh. He went long way from his home in Baltimore, to fall out of a window!!!

I had no paternal information to put in, so I skipped over to his mother and entered her as Eliza, with no Surname and a birth date of about 1816 in Baltimore, Maryland, along with her death date and place from her obituary. After moving through the next few screens I was back on the Pedigree page and found the “Shakey Leaf” for an Ancestry hint. One entry popped up for the 1880 census for Samuel A. Whittle, and mother Eliza with a residence in Towsontown, Baltimore, Maryland. At the bottom of the page, line 47, I found the Head of the Household Eliza Whittle age 64 (b. abt 1816), Samuel N. age 37 (b. abt 1843) listed as her son. The initial is an N and the transcriber merely made an error with the A. Also in the home is Grand Daughter Clara M. age 14 (b. abt 1866) and Grand Daughter Maggie S. age 11 (b. abt 1869) both born in Maryland. Samuel is listed as a Plasterer and both he and Eliza are listed as Widowed.1

1880 Federal Census for Samuel N. Whittle

1880 Federal Census for Samuel N. Whittle

A quick check of the next page shows six more members of the household that are Boarders. All six men are in the construction trade and probably work with or for Samuel. I make a note of the names in case any of them appear later. It is possible they are related in some way to Samuel. There could easily be a Brother-In-Law or Cousin in the group. Looking two pages in front and two pages to the rear of the main entry showed no other Whittles. I accepted the census record to Samuel and moved on.

Searching from the Family Group page in Ancestry brought up no other entries. A basic search from the main search page for Samuel Whittle brought up no other entries for my guy so it’s time for a different style of searching.

Future Research
  • Newspaper search for Pittsburgh papers on 7-10 Oct 1862 for the fall from the window
  • Baltimore City Directories for Samuel Whittle to see if he owned his own business

1. 1880 U.S. census, Baltimore County, Maryland, population schedule, Towsontown, enumeration district (ED) 246, p. 10 (handwritten), dwelling 13, family 13, Samuel N. Whittle; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 28 Sep 2008); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 496.

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Scholefield Family Tree

Now that additional family members have been located, there are vital records that need to be located and/or confirmed. In addition to the Arizona birth and death certificates that are already online, some indexes might also be available on FamilySearch. For recent deaths, any one of a number of the available Social Security Death Indexes should be checked, and any other available death indexes should be explored.

Checking Hugh Wallis’s list of IGI Batch numbers, it will be found that there are no indexes created for Arizona, but there are plenty for New York and California. (I will save IGI hits on family group sheets — if any — for later!)

Beginning with the most recent family groups, which are for the children of George and Clara Scholefield, I find additional data from several sources that report Helen’s husband’s information and more specific data regarding their son. A search for Max Brodie on Ancestry turns up his World War I draft card and an entry for him in the California Death Index. A search for Armour Major Brodie on Ancestry turns up his Social Security information, and a check of Arizona’s online records turns up his birth certificate. He was not named at birth and his mother filed his full name at a later date. Vitals summary:

Max Mordacai Brodie was born 28 Jul 1877 in Germany and died 23 Mar 1962 in Los Angeles County, California.1 He was married on 10 Oct 1907 in Tucson, Pima, Arizona,2 to Helen Scholefield who was born 5 Mar 1886 in Tucson, Pima, Arizona, and died 17 Jul 1957 in Tucson, Pima, Arizona.3
Their son:
bulletA. Major Brodie b. 9 Jun 1909, Rodger’s Hospital, Tucson, Pima, Arizona and d. 12 Nov 1970, Tucson, Pima, Arizona, never married.4

One of Carl’s daughter’s obituaries was located which names all her siblings,5 and a few searches turn up information about them. Arizona records had been located earlier in the search, but I did not post the data because I was not sure if they were possibly living. Social Security information was located for those siblings who died after deaths began to be recorded. Only one child was born before the SSDI and he was located on Ancestry in a Montana Death Index. Information for Carl as well as the children who were born or died in California was also indexed. George B. is presenting a difficulty because I cannot locate his birth record in Arizona even after searching only with the first names of him and his parents during a range of appropriate years. Vitals summary for Carl’s family:

Carl Burnett Scholefield was born 18 Apr 1888 in either Tucson or Globe, Arizona, and died Nov 1966 in Santa Clara County, California.6 He married Alice Hester Bradford who was born on 1 Mar 1891 and died in Dec 1979.7
Their children:
bulletBlissie H. Scholefield b. 16 May 1912 in Alameda County, California, and d. Sep 1995 m. ______ Lee. 8
bulletCatherine Hester Scholefield b. 26 Oct 1913 in Pima County, Arizona, and d. 26 Dec 2005 in Reno, Nevada, m. Hans Schnitter.9
bulletAda Virginia Scholefield b. 8 Apr 1915 in Rosemont, Arizona, and d. 3 Jun 2005 in Placerville, California, m. Charles E. Matson on 17 Nov 1945 in Reno, Nevada.10
bulletGeorge B. Scholefield b. abt 1917 in Arizona and d. 16 Aug 1957 in Granite County, Montana, m. ______.11
bulletCarroll Mae Scholefield b. 24 Sep 1919 in Vail, Arizona, and d. 14 Apr 1965 in Santa Clara County, California, m. ______ Tuttle.12

A search of the records at FamilySearch did not turn up any records which were not submitted by patrons (other than SSDI). Most of the information matches the birth and death information which was located.

1. “World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 Sep 2008), Max Mordacai Brodie, serial no. 3849, order no. A2550, Draft Board 0, Tucson, Pima, Arizona; citing World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M1509, roll 1522647; “California Death Index, 1940-1997,” database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 Sep 2008), entry for Max Brodie (23 Mar 1962); citing State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics.
2. “Brodie-Scholefeld Wedding,” Tucson Daily Citizen, 10 Oct 1907, p. 5, col. 3; digital images, GenealogyBank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 29 Sep 2008).

(more…)

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Govanstown Cemetery Project

The Whittle Plot

I went back to the little email from Dr. Anderson and while I was disappointed in my first attempt I wanted to try again. In looking at the list I felt something tug at me and noticed that I was unable to get past Samuel Whittle. No matter how many times I looked at this little email, the name Samuel Whittle called to me. So I decided to go with my gut and I made my choice; Samuel Whittle, buried in Govanstown Cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland, with a death date prior to 1917 would be the Cold Case that I documented start to finish.

Everyone searches in different ways. My first stop was a search for an obituary or funeral notice that might have the name of Govanstown in it. There might be a dozen Samuel Whittles that lived and died over the years in Baltimore, however, I’m only interested in the ones that were buried in Govanstown. I had been unable to tie the Moses family to Govanstown by any solid documentation and was only able to give Dr. Anderson my best guesses. I wanted and needed to do better.

I utilized my subscription with GenealogyBank.com to search the Maryland Newspapers. The first page yielded several articles that mentioned Samuel Whittle, but my first solid lead about his death came on the fourth item . In a News Article titled County Miscellany on Page 6 dated 12 Oct 1892 in The Sun from Baltimore:1

Samuel N. Whittle Dies

Samuel N. Whittle Dies

A quick check on the calendar showed the Monday mentioned to be 10 Oct 1892 so I searched specifically on that date, but had no real luck using Whittle. I switched the search and used only Samuel with a keyword of Govanstown and after a short search I found the following notices that were posted on 8 and 10 Oct 1892. Both appeared in The Sun on Page 2 in the Mortuary Notices:

WHITTLE – Suddenly on October 7 at Allegheny City, Penna., SAMUEL N. WHITTLE, of Towson, Md,. aged 50 years. The funeral will take place from his late residence, Towson, Baltimore county, this (Monday) morning, at 10:30 o’clock. Interment at Govanstown. [Monday 10th] 2

My first questions were hardly genealogical – how did he fall out of a window? Followed promptly by – why was he in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania? Was he pushed out of the window? Whoa Sharon, way too many hours watching the “First 48” and Columbo!

The search for Whittle did not turn up this funeral notice and there could be any one of a number of reasons for it. The scanning software for newspapers is often at a disadvantage for old newspapers with blurred print,creases, and stray ink marks. This is the kind of name where the software could have real issues – it will be wise to search Whittle, Whiffle, Whittie, Whittley, Wibble and any other number of combinations.

While continued searching presented no other articles or information concerning a death for any other Samuel Whittle, he was mentioned in another death notice. The notice appeared on 12 Sep 1896 on Page 6 of The Sun as the 2nd paragraph under the title of “Deaths in the County”:3

Eliza Whittle's Death Notice

Eliza Whittle's Death Notice

This led me to her funeral notice on Page 4 in the same paper:4

Eliza Whittle's Funeral Notice

Eliza Whittle's Funeral Notice

Okay folks, here is the “er duh!” moment of the day. Arwen was reviewing my post for me, because I’m new to posting on a website, and pointed out the obvious. It’s a blurry scan and the time is 3 pm. As Arwen rightfully pointed out to me, the 8 listed in her age is larger at the bottom, and the 3 on the line below has the same “weight” on the top and bottom.

Of course this did not happen until I had gone off a tangent about what an unusual time for a funeral. How 8 pm seems a little late and how Daylight Savings did not come into effect until 1907, so on 15 Sep 1896 it would have been dark (or near dark) by 8 pm. It seemed odd to me that they would have been taking a body to the cemetery at night. I even checked the weather conditions to see if it was rainy and clearing later in the day. It was forecast to be clear and sunny but not too warm. I even wandered about in a discussion about having a funeral on Sunday, including information about ice not being available for purchase on Sunday’s and a dozen other things. The bottom line – it’s a three and I’m laughing at myself while being more than a little red faced. It’s called, “Look for the obvious”!!!!!

1. “County Miscellany,” The Sun, 12 Oct 1892, p. 6; digital images, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 27 Sep 2008)
2. “Mortuary Notices,” The Sun, 10 Oct 1892, p. 2; digital images, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 27 Sep 2008)
3. “Deaths in the County,” The Sun, 12 Sep 1896, p. 6; digital images, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 27 Sep 2008)
4. “Mortuary Notices,” The Sun, 12 Sep 1896, p. 4; digital images, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 27 Sep 2008)

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